Active lifestyles can help damaged nerves heal after spinal cord injury, study finds

A dorsal root ganglion neuron treated with the CBP-activator drug CSP-TTK21. Red - neuronal marker (Beta-III-tubulin) and green - H4K8 acetylation. Credit: Simone Di Giovanni and Thomas Hutson / Imperial College London

Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury, new research has found.

Early-stage findings, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, come from studies in mice and rats with spinal cord injuries, in which scientists uncovered a mechanism for nerve fibers repairing after they had been damaged.

An international team, led by researchers from Imperial College London, found that providing rodents with more space, an exercise wheel, toys and company before an injury helped to ‘prime’ their cells, making it more likely their damaged nerves would regenerate following spinal injury.

Read the full story here

Here is the full report: Thomas Hutson et al. ‘Cbp-dependent histone acetylation mediates axon regeneration induced by environmental enrichment in rodent spinal cord injury models. Science Translational Medicine, 2019 DOI: 10.1126/

Active lifestyles can help damaged nerves heal after spinal cord injury, study finds